A collection of 100 French stereophotographs of the First World War, painting an intimate (and grim) picture of daily life of the 'poilus' in the trenches of the Western Front. First World War.

A collection of 100 French stereophotographs of the First World War, painting an intimate (and grim) picture of daily life of the 'poilus' in the trenches of the Western Front

The gelatin silver stereophotographs (uniform external dimensions approximately 57 × 125 mm) are unmounted as issued; all have slight longitudinal curvature (possibly as issued); apart from a few slightly rubbed corners, they are in uniformly fine condition.

The photographs are numbered and captioned in the space between the two images; this collection comprises an unbroken run of 100 from '2597. Sentinelles avancées derrière un talus' to '2696. Pêche à la ligne'. There are numerous scenes depicting the misery of life in the trenches (especially when flooded); other main themes include the bodies of German soldiers, artillery batteries, columns of infantry on the move, towns and villages devastated by artillery fire, pastimes in the trenches and military infrastructure. Most appear to have been taken around Maricourt (on the Somme, near Péronne), possibly in 1916, and possibly by the Section photographique de l'armée (SPA). This Army Photographic Section was created in April 1915, with the aim of documenting the war and producing images to counter German propaganda. A number of its photographers were equipped with stereoscopic cameras, most commonly using 6 × 13 cm negatives. Smaller than the traditional tripod-mounted cameras, the compact stereoscopic camera allowed the photographer to move freely across the battlefield (Ministère des armées website). The format and subject matter of these images would seem to support attribution to this unit.

Item #115317

Price: $1,100.00

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