A Journal or, Historical Account of the Life, Travels and Christian Experiences, of that Antient [sic], Faithful Servant of Jesus Christ, Thomas Chalkley, who departed this Life in the Island of Tortola, the Fourth Day of the Ninth Month, 1741. Thomas CHALKLEY.
A Journal or, Historical Account of the Life, Travels and Christian Experiences, of that Antient [sic], Faithful Servant of Jesus Christ, Thomas Chalkley, who departed this Life in the Island of Tortola, the Fourth Day of the Ninth Month, 1741
A Journal or, Historical Account of the Life, Travels and Christian Experiences, of that Antient [sic], Faithful Servant of Jesus Christ, Thomas Chalkley, who departed this Life in the Island of Tortola, the Fourth Day of the Ninth Month, 1741

A Journal or, Historical Account of the Life, Travels and Christian Experiences, of that Antient [sic], Faithful Servant of Jesus Christ, Thomas Chalkley, who departed this Life in the Island of Tortola, the Fourth Day of the Ninth Month, 1741

London, Printed and Sold by Luke Hinde, 1751 (second edition)/ 1749.

Octavo, x, 326 pages.

Early full calf later rebacked in (lighter) calf with a contrasting title-label; old boards marked, discoloured and a little worn (but inoffensively so); endpapers a little marked (more so the front one), with details of several owners on the front flyleaf (dating from 1818 to 1973); old annotations on the last page and adjacent binder's blank; small hole in the bottom corner of the title leaf; some foxing and discolouration to the text; mild signs of use and age, but overall a decent copy.

Offered with a copy in similar condition of the first edition of a companion volume, 'The Works of that Ancient, Faithful Servant of Jesus Christ, Thomas Chalkley ... containing his Epistles and Other Writings' (London, Luke Hinde, 1751). London-born Thomas Chalkey (1675-1741) 'was probably the most influential quaker minister in America during the eighteenth century. His position seems to have been nearly analogous to that of a modern missionary bishop', making numerous preaching excursions throughout North America, with voyages to Barbados and the West Indies. In later years, 'he chiefly resided at Frankfort, near Philadelphia. In the autumn of 1741 he went to Tortola, one of the Virgin Islands, where he was seized with fever and died after a few days' illness, only one of his twelve children, a girl, surviving him. The narrow escapes he had are very numerous, and in nearly every instance he insinuates that he was saved by a miracle. His Journal, from its quaint simplicity, is still intensely interesting; its popularity among the Friends is shown by its having been reprinted at least a dozen times in England [up to 1842]' (Dictionary of National Biography).

Item #100121

Price: $400.00