An Account of the Religion, Manners, and Learning of the People of Malabar, in Several Letters written from some of the Most Learned Men of that Country to the Danish Missionaries. Translated from the High-Dutch by J. Tho. Phillips. Bartholomäeu ZIEGENBALG.
An Account of the Religion, Manners, and Learning of the People of Malabar, in Several Letters written from some of the Most Learned Men of that Country to the Danish Missionaries. Translated from the High-Dutch by J. Tho. Phillips
An Account of the Religion, Manners, and Learning of the People of Malabar, in Several Letters written from some of the Most Learned Men of that Country to the Danish Missionaries. Translated from the High-Dutch by J. Tho. Phillips
An Account of the Religion, Manners, and Learning of the People of Malabar, in Several Letters written from some of the Most Learned Men of that Country to the Danish Missionaries. Translated from the High-Dutch by J. Tho. Phillips

An Account of the Religion, Manners, and Learning of the People of Malabar, in Several Letters written from some of the Most Learned Men of that Country to the Danish Missionaries. Translated from the High-Dutch by J. Tho. Phillips

London, printed for W. Mears, 1717 (first English edition).

Duodecimo, [x], 180 pages plus a frontispiece and a small folding map. The title leaf is in its uncancelled state, with the imprint showing only W. Mears as publisher.

Early panelled calf a little worn, but skilfully rebacked in calf (retaining portions of the original spine, and the old endpapers); leading margin of the last two leaves of the preface slightly trimmed; paper discoloured and moderately to heavily foxed; edges (mainly around the top corner) inkstained, with minimal impact on the margins; small stains to the blank bottom margin of the last 25 leaves; mild signs of use and age; overall a decent copy.

German by birth, Ziegenbalg founded the Danish Lutheran mission at Tranquebar (Tharangambadi, Tamil Nadu) in 1706. He was the first translator of the New Testament into Tamil, and an early printer in that language. The correspondence reprinted here, between Ziegenbalg and an unnamed Tamil scholar, is chiefly concerned with explaining Hindu religion and society.

The calling card of 'Mr H.A.D.J. Gyles / Royal Navy / HMS Lion' is mounted on the pastedown over an earlier bookplate (now partially defaced). Apparently 18 ships of the Royal Navy have been named 'Lion', from 1511 to 1975; we have found reference to Gyles serving on HMS 'Actaeon' (so named in 1886, sold in 1923), narrowing the period of his ownership of this book.

Item #68539

Price: $800.00

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