Morning. Owned and edited by Paris Nesbit QC. Volume 1, Number 1, 29 August 1900 to Number 18, 26 December 1900. [Bound with] Century (with which is incorporated 'Morning'), Volume 1, Number 19, 2 January 1901 to Volume 2, Number 32, 5 June 1901. Paris NESBIT.
Morning. Owned and edited by Paris Nesbit QC. Volume 1, Number 1, 29 August 1900 to Number 18, 26 December 1900. [Bound with] Century (with which is incorporated 'Morning'), Volume 1, Number 19, 2 January 1901 to Volume 2, Number 32, 5 June 1901
Morning. Owned and edited by Paris Nesbit QC. Volume 1, Number 1, 29 August 1900 to Number 18, 26 December 1900. [Bound with] Century (with which is incorporated 'Morning'), Volume 1, Number 19, 2 January 1901 to Volume 2, Number 32, 5 June 1901

Morning. Owned and edited by Paris Nesbit QC. Volume 1, Number 1, 29 August 1900 to Number 18, 26 December 1900. [Bound with] Century (with which is incorporated 'Morning'), Volume 1, Number 19, 2 January 1901 to Volume 2, Number 32, 5 June 1901

Adelaide, Paris Nesbit (to Number 15), then John Newton Wood, 1900 and 1901.

Foolscap folio, [242] pages.

Each issue drop-title as issued, in contemporary flush-cut cloth-backed papered boards; cloth renewed; boards lightly worn at the extremities and a little marked; the contents are in fine condition. Number 32, the first one in Volume 2, is a different format - shorter and wider - and the leading margins are folded back 40 mm.

'The small religious newspaper "Morning" was founded in 1900 by the gifted but unbalanced lawyer, Paris Nesbit. The newspaper was initially used largely as a vehicle for his personal views on religion and Adelaide society. Nesbit unashamedly stated that the newspaper was his own voice and would be run "as Christ would if He were subject to the present limitations of my faculties" ... Nesbit and his family - in particular his sister Agnes Benham - were interested in the "new thought" movement of the 1890s, with its socialism and sexual reform.... Early issues of the newspaper contained items commenting on Nesbit's short stint in the Parkside Mental Asylum in 1898, which he felt had been politically motivated by his enemies, including the premier Charles Kingston. Kingston, as well as other political and church leaders, were criticised in early issues of the newspaper, as were various Adelaide lawyers. Nesbit felt particularly strongly about religious hypocrisy. Benham contributed book reviews and periodic articles, mostly on religious topics, during the early life of "Morning". Much attention was given by various contributors (many writing under pseudonyms) to Benham and Nesbit's views that ideal marriage relationships were based on intellectual and spiritual connection.... After just four months Nesbit handed over the editorship of the newspaper to the printer John Newton Wood who steered the newspaper towards an interest in spiritualism and vegetarianism' (SA Memory, online). The final issue appeared in 1909.

Item #108066

Price (AUD): $3,300.00

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